Belgian Journal of Paediatrics
Feasibility and safety of early mobilization in critically ill children: A prospective experimental study
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Keywords

Early mobilization
Feasibility
Pediatric intensive care unit
Pediatrics
Critically ill children
Safety

Categories

How to Cite

Moerman, D., Reychler, G., Bednarek, P., Clément de Cléty, S., Detaille, T., & Houtekie, L. (2024). Feasibility and safety of early mobilization in critically ill children: A prospective experimental study. Belgian Journal of Paediatrics, 26(1), 11–15. Retrieved from http://belgjpaediatrics.com/index.php/bjp/article/view/60

Abstract

Objective

The study aims to evaluate the feasibility and the safety of early mobilization in critically ill children under 2 years old and its impact on comfort scores.

Methods

Children were recruited in our tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit. One session of upper and lower limb mobilization was performed within 48 hours after admission. The heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP, respectively) and pulse oximetry oxygen saturation (SpO2) were recorded before (T0) and at the end of the mobilization (T1). Parameters were also noted at 10 min (T2), 30 min (T3) and 1 hour after the end of the mobilization (T4). The EDIN score and the Comfort-B score were used to assess comfort.

Results

Twenty patients were included and mobilized. HR, SBP and DPB showed no change at the end of the mobilization compared to baseline (138 bpm ± 20 vs 133 bpm ± 15; 101 mmHg ± 18 vs 94 mmHg ± 12; 54 mmHg ± 11 vs 49 mmHg ± 7, respectively). RR and SpO2 did not statistically change during the study. Four sessions of mobilization were interrupted because of discomfort associated with increased EDIN and Comfort-B scores. No technical adverse events were recorded.

Interpretation

Early mobilization is feasible and safe in most stable critically ill children under 2 years old as long as the height and type of surgery allow for mobilization of the patient. Discomfort was observed in 20% of the children.

 

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